The Domestique Critique: Art of Endurance

Photo: Rhea Aldridge rheaaldridge.com

Art of Endurance is yet another Australian kit brand with unique designs to offer women. I mean, I’m starting to get jealous I don’t live in Australia. I feel like everyone there is the most well-dressed cyclist on the planet. Art of Endurance can help you stand out even more.

I had the chance to ride in the Tesselate kit for a few months. It’s always exciting to roll up to a group ride and show off a kit. The Tesselate is a striking design, offered in pink and light blue, inspired by the many mountains climbed in training and is a play on the humble triangle as a metaphor for the daily challenges we face and overcome. Continue reading

The Domestique Critique: Svelte Heritage Jersey

Heritage_SS_1

Flash sale? I’M IN. Finally bought this jersey that I was coveting for months. It’s a gorgeous jersey that has well thought out details and is perfect for mild days outside. The Heritage jersey is Svelte’s flagship product, designed as both stylish and functional for any kind of riding. Continue reading

The Domestique Critique: RedWhite The BIB

RedWhite is an anomaly in the cycling clothing industry – they only focus on bibshorts. Specifically, endurance bibshorts. The bibshorts are designed with long rides of 4 to 5 hours or more in mind. RedWhite was started in 2014 by two men based in Singapore so it took them awhile to develop a women’s short, but they made it a priority to test and re-test until they released the women’s bibshort, The BIB. Continue reading

Buy Now, Ship Later. Are Pre-Orders a Scam or Smart Business?

pre·or·der
priˈôrdər/
verb
  1. order (an item of merchandise) before it is available, with the understanding that it will be shipped later.
noun
  1. an order for an item that has not yet been made commercially available.

 

It seems like a good chunk of the kit I post is available only by pre-order. It can feel like a sales tactic to create the presumption of ‘limited edition’, giving you that BUY NOW rush to your mobile or computer. But for small start-ups or creative cyclists with a knack for graphic design, it can be the easiest way to share great kit design without breaking their personal bank. I ask several players of the pre-order game to explain how and why it works.

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Prism.Bike is a one-man operation on a mission to make dynamic kit that expresses personality. Kit is available through pre-order only, creating an exclusive feel to those that purchase before the window closes. Often that window is only 24 hours before selling out. Oliver of Prism.Bike shared his view on using pre-ordering:

A pre-order usually means I am paying upfront for a kit that I am attracted to but really unsure about how it fits and unable to see it on other cyclists similar to myself because it’s not an available product. How do you address this concern for consumers?

I think this is tough for buying any clothing on the interwebs. Especially anything lycra.  I took the approach of just paying a great photographer (@beardmcbeardy), to take some photos of people wearing the prototype of the kits.  I got tired of seeing people standing in front of a wall wearing a kit [in ads] and wanted to know what kits look like on the bike when you are sweating bullets after having a bit of a crack.  So for the photos we got the models to smash it up a hill for 15 minutes then took some snaps.

Also, my designs are pretty unique, so people either immediately love them or they don’t. If people love them and know there isn’t anything similar, they are pretty cool to take a punt.  If anyone emails me or has questions about quality I put them in touch with other customers on social media.  I am really passionate that the stuff I make has to be comfortable on long rides and really good quality… otherwise, what is the point?

 

Continue reading